Suboxone Strips – Short Term, Long Term & Side Effects

Suboxone Strips – Short Term, Long Term & Side Effects


There are massive amounts of individuals all around the world that have become addicted to various substances. Opiates are undoubtedly some of the most commonly abused drugs. Breaking free of these medications is possible, but the process will not be easy. Thankfully, there are some aids, which can make the task slightly easier. This is where Suboxone strips come into the picture. Within this guide, you will learn all there is to know about these strips.

What Is Suboxone?

Suboxone is a medication, which is commonly used to combat opioid addiction. The medication actually uses a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone to help wean the user off of the opiate. Although Suboxone is very similar to Subutex, it is also different, since it uses two active ingredients, instead of just one. The added Naloxone can help to make the medication more effective, by blocking the effects of opiate medications.

What Are Suboxone Strips?

It should be known that Suboxone is available in a variety of different forms. Although it is more frequently prescribed in pill form, the medication is also available in strips. The strips work in an identical manner to the pills, although the actual usage is slightly different. The strips contain 8mg of Suboxone and 2mg of Naloxone. This combination has been proven effective, so you can rest assured knowing that the strips will help you break free of your opioid addiction.

How They Work

Before attempting to utilize these strips, you should take the time to figure out precisely how they work. The strips aren’t much different from the pills and will work in a similar manner. The medication is capable of interacting with your brain’s opiate receptors. It provides the user with the same euphoric feeling, which is felt when consuming other opiates. Of course, it doesn’t deliver the overwhelming high, which can be disorienting.

When used properly, the strips are capable of eliminating your opiate cravings, while alleviating the withdrawal symptoms. The combination will allow you to withdraw from the drugs much easier and without so much pain and suffering.

Potential Adverse Effects

Before consuming any type of medications, even strips, you should familiarize yourself with the potential risks. Although Suboxone is generally very mild and safe, it does have a few negative adverse effects, which may occur. These will be listed below for your convenience.

  • Headaches and pain
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Constipation
  • Insomnia and restlessness
  • Peripheral edema

Although these effects aren’t necessarily dangerous, they can be frightening and annoying. In order to lower the chances of experiencing these, you should only use the strips, as instructed by your doctor. Also, be sure that you never mix the medication with others like xanax or tramadol.

Understanding The Suboxone Strips High



There are many individuals, who will attempt to abuse Suboxone, in hopes of getting high. Although this might seem like a good idea, it is not. Suboxone is designed to prevent the user from experiencing a high, when using other opiates. Although it can provide you with a mild euphoria, it will not deliver the overwhelming high, which is associated with heroin and other harsher drugs.

With this in mind, Suboxone, whether in the pill form or strips, should not be used, as a way to get high. The results will not be those that are desired. Also, utilizing the medication with others is a mistake, as the Suboxone will void the effects of the other medications.

Opiate Blocking Properties

It should be known that Suboxone works like an opiate blocker. It actually blocks the brain’s opiate receptors and prevents these medications from inflicting a high on the user. Also, the Naloxone in the drug will actually result in an instant opiate withdrawal, when combined with other opiates. Therefore, other opiates should be avoided, when utilizing Suboxone.

Overall

All in all, Suboxone is a medication, which is used to combat opiate addictions. As long as you use the drug safely and do not mix it with others, you should not experience any adverse side effects.

David Warren
David Warren

Pharmaceutical specialist at Wealthformyhealth.com
David Warren is a pharmaceutical specialist that dispenses prescription medication on a daily basis. He received a Bachelor of Science degree in pharmacy from the University of Tennessee in 1991. With over 50 publications on medication-related and pharmacy topics, David has been able to share his experiences and knowledge with others.

David with lots of experience and knowledge in medications that are utilized to treat a wide range of medical conditions. Before David dispenses a medication to a patient, he will go over the side effects, dosage recommendation and contraindications.
David Warren

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9 Comments
  1. Anonymous October 28, 18:49 Reply
    suboxone is a fucking nightmare drug, they are finding out it is harder to kick than methadone. both subs and methadone are extemely hard on your liver and kidneys.i dont even know where to begin.personaly for me subs make me feel like i am underwater, drowning, it makes the acupunture points directly under my collarbone, third eye and the center of my palm way over stimulated, energy is just pouring out of them. severely thirsty but barely peeing, cant sleep, severe anxiety agitation. if taken for a month i break out in tiny zits all over face, severe pms -swelling of tits,anxiety(i spent two weeks freaking out thinking i was pregnant) it also makes cumming harder/not right.
  2. Billibonj April 27, 20:37 Reply
    I have just recently been out in it for pain, but I believe the PM is also trying to reduce the withdrawal from the opiote meds I've been on, just recently Belbuca film and Nucynta....... he advised me that the Belbuca and Nucynta can't even work together as what's in the Belbuca blocks the Nucynta doing its job because the Belbuca in your brain what the Nucynta is supposed to do. He suggested that maybe I was just getting a placebo effect from the Nucynta but I explained I couldn't really tell since my pain never really goes away completely and so it's naggging effects are always there. At first visit to the new PM I was switched to T3, roboxin, something called Butatbital( for migraines and neck tension) and Nortriptyline 10mg 1-3 at bed for sleep and nerve pain. I was supposed to followed with previous PM Dr to fill my rx's given by her one last time just in case or to be able to utilize with my new regimen rx'd by the new PM...... needless to say I missed that appt on a Monday morning after Easter because I was just wiped out! Since then I have felt like I have the flu, hot and cold, sweating and burning all over, head very fuzzy, etc. I had been using the 2 opiote meds I had left sparingly but then it occurred to me, could I possibly be going Thru withdrawal? I emailed the new Drs office right away and within 5 minutes I had them on the phone and an appt for the following Saturday! The new Dr put me on suboxene without really saying it was for withdrawal but used for pain and as a gastric bypass patient it was a good fit because I can I use it in a strip to desolve in my mouth, therefore getting into my blood stream quicker. I still after 6 years of being post op gastric bypass I still can't get anyone to answer the ? Do these medicines metabolize and leave my body quicker than the norm and that NSAID'S are a big no no especially since I have a pretty big ulcer, yet they still suggest them for inflammation and I have to repeat myself again NO NSAID's and then there also that anything time release or slow acting will not work for me because of yes the way I motabolize its out of my system before it can do its job. Yet they still try! Frustrating at times, it's as if I speaking Chinese and they can't translate! I did notice the first few days of the Suboxone I seemed to have no pain at all, or so significant significantly less that I am actually notice. Yet I'm still tired and heads still fuzzy....... am I still experiencing withdrawal or am I in a flare from all the changes and stress...... flares are no fun! Neither is being stuck on the medication and dr merry-go-round! Anyone else experience anything g like this? I'd love to hear it's not just me! Lol Over
  3. Mawmaw53 April 12, 14:59 Reply
    Has anyone out there ever been put on Suboxone for pain ? My Doctor put me on it for pain and I have never had a drug addiction. Is this common ? I also noticed that my pain is still there and I feel just a little more active which seems to make me over do myself and my pain gets worse. Not sure if the suboxone is right for me . I have never been one to take pain meds. always scared of them but my pain is getting to be unbearable and the over the counter stuff just don't work much anymore either.
  4. Anonymous March 01, 18:23 Reply
    As Suboxone is the greatest medicine which includes the effective combination of two crucial compounds such as naloxone and buprenorphine, it gets me out from the addiction of regularly using the opioid pain killer drug. This opioid partial agonists drug provided me an amazing result with the complete relieves from the symptoms of the opiate withdrawal. As the buprenorphine ingredient is the narcotic and powerful substance, it completely avoids the addiction of using the different opioids such as hydrocodone, heroin and more.
  5. Karla January 29, 18:48 Reply
    How long should it take for someone who has used heroin to feel good using soboxone
  6. Anonymous January 11, 09:25 Reply
    Recently, one of my family members suggested me to use the Suboxone drug in order to get rid of my opioid addiction. I have done a lot of researches on this drug before going to use it and I have found that it has two effective ingredients called naloxone and buprenorphine which are the main reasons for its extraordinary addiction recovery results. I was really amazed with its agonist activity and effective results at last.
  7. Anonymous January 11, 09:22 Reply
    I usually got chronic leg pains and I used one famous opioid drug as the pain killer. First, I was using it just for reducing my pain and later it has become an addiction to me. My physician suggested me to make use of the Suboxone drug to treat this opioid pain killer addiction.
  8. Anonymous January 04, 02:25 Reply
    I thank my father who told me about the Suboxone medicine which is currently the hot and widely used drug for treating the narcotic addiction. I usually have a habit of using the narcotic pain killers and finally I had faced a lot of health problems including heart attack. My father recommended using the Suboxone drug as per the prescription and direction of his physician. Now, I’m really happy with my healthy lifestyle.
  9. Dave June 19, 00:15 Reply
    My strips taste little funny and look blotchy dark and light all over
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